Join the conversation!

Two of our very own Conservation Police Officers Kauffman and Filipiak, with help from wildlife rescuer and rehabber LeeAnn Johnson and Flint Creek Rescue, rescued two injured pelicans in the Illinois River between the lock and dam and starved rock this weekend. Great teamwork!! ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Two of our very own Conservation Police Officers Kauffman and Filipiak, with help from wildlife rescuer and rehabber LeeAnn Johnson and Flint Creek Rescue, rescued two injured pelicans in the Illinois River between the lock and dam and starved rock this weekend.  Great teamwork!!

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for rescuing them!

Wonderful!! Good job!

Thank you for helping them!

Thank you bunches!! Good ppl doing good!! 😘😘😘

Wow that had to feel good! Especially for the pelicans😊

Diane! These are the pelicans you called them about!!!

You Are Heroes!!

Love pelicans!!! Thank you for helping!

This month’s THROWBACK THURSDAY takes us on a trip back in time to the turn of the 20th century when Starved Rock was privately owned and operated by Ferdinand Walther. The Walthers’ turned Starved Rock into a park developed as the “Gilbraltar of the West”, with public access to a swimming pool, ferry boat transportation, ice cream parlor, hotel, cabins, and a bowling alley.

The hotel was built in 1891 and had three floors and an entire restaurant on the first floor that could be transformed into a dance hall when needed. The hotel was so popular that vacancy was rarely an issue for the 65 guest rooms capable of housing 218 people. Each room cost $4.50 unless it was occupied by two or more people, which increased the price to $6.

“No Vacancy” no problem, those that still wished to stay at the park’s hotel would choose to pay the fees to sleep on the couches, chairs, and floors. The lodging fee offered more than just a shelter, as meals were included with the lodging price as well.

The hotel stood proudly for a little over 50 years before being replaced by the Starved Rock Lodge built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1939. The hotel stood vacant for a little over a year before being demolished. The location where it once stood is on a knoll between the visitor center and Starved Rock itself, and is referred to as the “Hotel Plaza.”

This post was created by Conservation Education Representative Ben Garbacz.
... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

This month’s THROWBACK THURSDAY takes us on a trip back in time to the turn of the 20th century when Starved Rock was privately owned and operated by Ferdinand Walther.  The Walthers’ turned Starved Rock into a park developed as the “Gilbraltar of the West”,  with public access to a swimming pool, ferry boat transportation, ice cream parlor, hotel, cabins, and a bowling alley.

The hotel was built in 1891 and had three floors and an entire restaurant on the first floor that could be transformed into a dance hall when needed.  The hotel was so popular that vacancy was rarely an issue for the 65 guest rooms capable of housing 218 people. Each room cost $4.50 unless it was occupied by two or more people, which increased the price to $6.  

“No Vacancy” no problem, those that still wished to stay at the park’s hotel would choose to pay the fees to sleep on the couches, chairs, and floors.  The lodging fee offered more than just a shelter, as meals were included with the lodging price as well.

The hotel stood proudly for a little over 50 years before being replaced by the Starved Rock Lodge built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1939.  The hotel stood vacant for a little over a year before being demolished.  The location where it once stood is on a knoll between the visitor center and Starved Rock itself, and is referred to as the “Hotel Plaza.”

This post was created by Conservation Education Representative Ben Garbacz.Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

Never knew about the hotel. Once again we were at Starved Rock this week for an overnight stay after the progressive dinner trolley ride.

How interesting!! Thank you for sharing this wonderful information!😊😊👏👏

My family has photos from a great aunt that traveled to Starved Rock back then. I love the history of the park.

Thank you. I never heard this history.

An aerial view of lodge construction on the bluff from the 1930s.

I loved working there! And it sure as grown!!!Always home!💚

Thanks for sharing this treasure and historical information! ⭐️ This is the positive side of Fbook!

Lovely look back in time. Do you have CCC photos?

Now That Is Great History I Didnt Know Thank You

Sharon Shieh

Julie Payne

Load more

Donate funds or resources

Donate

The Starved Rock Foundation through generous donations from people like you help further funding for park programs, events, and interpretive materials such as exhibits, maps, and signage found throughout the park.

Through your generosity education and enjoyment of the outdoors can continue at Starved Rock State Park.  We need your help!


Make checks payable to:

Starved Rock Foundation
P.O. Box 398
Utica, IL 61373


How donations are helping

You will be surprised in what can make a difference with keeping this fabulous system running. It is not only about financial assistance but also about people and gifts-in-kind. Look over some of the items below to get an idea of what types of items have helped in the past. We thank you for all of your kind gifts and generosity.

Examples of donated items

  • 8 Upbeat park benches ($6070)
  • Nikon D100 digital camera ($2740.20)
  • Dell Latitude D800 laptop and case ($1759)
  • Dell Dimension 4700 desktop ,Dell 962 all-in-one printer, External floppy drive ($1924.55)
  • 3M overhead projector ($360)
  • Microsoft Office with PowerPoint and Print Shop Deluxe Software ($189.98)
  • Hotpoint refrigerator ($230)
  • Emerson microwave oven ($69.88)

Examples of donated services

  • $2000 for video production of “The Recent History of the Illinois Indians”
  • $500 to Illinois Audubon Society (Starved Rock Audubon Chapter) for the Eagle Watch Weekend
  • $500 to the Utica Gazebo Fund (2004 tornado)
  • $1200 for Sunday Programs

Donate your time

Sign Up

Whether for a one time event or as an ongoing member of the foundation, we could use your help!

Sign-up to help with events


About the Starved Rock Foundation

MembershipThe Starved Rock Foundation is a friends group that supports the state park through educational programs, supplies, exhibit updates, leading hikes, trail walkers, front desk support, bookstore, and other labors of love. It is a volunteer-run organization. The Foundation and the staff at the park work hand-in-hand to provide a positive park experience. Without them, the Visitor’s Center, guided hikes, and programs could not happen. You can be part of this team!